JC's Navy updates

Published on by John

Sacrifices made by sailors to keep Britain’s sea lanes open ...

Publications récentes

UK: HMS Bristol - Royal Navy Training Ship To Get New Home

3 Septembre 2012

HMS Bristol, a firm fixture in Portsmouth Harbour for nearly 20 years, is about to get a new home. The Royal Navy training ship won’t be going far though, just 140 metres to the east of its current permanent berth at the tip of Whale Island.

The move may be a small one, but it will make a big difference to operations at Portsmouth International Port and the Royal Naval Base.

Relocating the former warship will remove a pinch point in the harbour that restricts the manoeuvring of larger ships.

The relocation will create an increased turning circle of 300 metres at phase one, and remove the pinch point between the bow of HMS Bristol and Fountain Lake Jetty increasing this distance by more than 90 metres.

HMS Bristol was the only Type 82 destroyer ever built for the Royal Navy, designed to defend a class of aircraft carriers that never saw the light of day. During 20 years of service she was part of the task force in the Falklands.

The ship is best known latterly as a training vessel with up to 17,000 visitors getting onboard each year. A favourite with sea cadets and naval recruits, a visit is often a first opportunity to experience life at sea without leaving the harbour.

As commercial vessels visiting Portsmouth International Port continue to grow in size, it’s become clear that a larger turning circle is required. Work to lengthen Berth 2 has recently been completed, now allowing ships up to 240 metres in length to safely berth at Portsmouth International Port.

An intensive programme of dredging means larger ships can also visit at a wider range of tides.

Portsmouth CIty Council, which owns and operates the Port, has given the go ahead for funds to construct Bristol’s new berth. Working in partnership with the Royal Navy plans are being finalised for the new mooring berth and associated works.

Construction has to fit in with the Royal Navy’s busy training schedule so work will start towards the end of November and will need to be completed by early February 2013, when visitors will once again be back aboard HMS Bristol.

Martin Putman, Port Manager of Portsmouth International Port, said

“We have been working closely with the Royal Navy to create a lot more space in the harbour whilst minimizing impact on the important training and support role provided by HMS Bristol.

“As commercial vessels continue to grow in size we are helping to develop our strategy for the future of the Port. This will maintain jobs and keeps investment coming into the city and local area.”

Commander Paul Jones, Commanding Officer HMS Excellent, added:

“Whale Island has strong working links with its neighbours and I am pleased that a happy compromise has been reached that benefits both the Royal Navy and the commercial activity of our home city.”

Britain Celebrates Merchant Navy Day

3 Septembre 2012

Sacrifices made by sailors to keep Britain’s sea lanes open will be marked with two events this month. The Red Ensign, standard of the Merchant Navy, flies proudly today on the service’s annual memorial day, while the First Sea Lord will take the salute in London at a parade honouring all merchantmen lost in conflict.

Today, Monday September 3, is Merchant Navy Day, a date in the diary set aside since 2000 for remembering merchant sailors who gave their lives in two world wars to ensure Britain survived blockade.

The merchant marine’s famous standard, the Red Ensign – commonly referred to by sailors as the ‘red duster’ – is being flown over the Department for Transport’s headquarters at Great Minster House in Westminster.

Indeed, on September 3 all public buildings are permitted (and encouraged) to raise the Red Ensign.

Today there are around 500 ships displacing more than 1,000 tons which fly the merchant marine’s standard. Although the Merchant Navy has shrunk substantially since WW1 and WW2, the UK relies on sea trade to sustain it with some 1.5 million tons of freight passing through the nation’s ports daily.

September 3 was chosen as the anniversary of the outbreak of war between Britain and Germany in 1939 – and the day when the Battle of the Atlantic began, with the first loss of life that very evening as the liner Athenia was torpedoed with the loss of 112 passengers and crew.

Those crew were the first of more than 20,000 merchant sailors lost between 1939 and 1945, while just under 15,000 men were lost under the Red Ensign in the 20th Century’s first global conflagration. More recently, six crew of the Atlantic Conveyor died when their container ship was struck by an Exocet missile during the Falklands War.

“Merchant Navy Day is an opportunity to not only remember seafarers of the past, but to look to a bright future for UK shipping. More than 20,000 merchant seafarers lost their lives in the Second World War alone, while working to provide this country with the means to survive,” said shipping minister Mike Penning.

“We owe those brave seafarers a debt of gratitude for their sacrifices and the contribution they made to our national wellbeing.”

The Royal Navy – which strove through both conflicts to shield civilian shipping and paid a heavy price for doing so – will be paying its tribute to merchant sailors later in September at the annual service of remembrance in London.

The Royal Naval Volunteer Band Association will lead a parade of Merchant Navy standards and standards of other associations, followed by serving and retired merchant seafarers with other organisations beginning at Mark Lane (Great Tower Street) at 12.30pm on Sunday September 16.

The principal guest at proceedings will be First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope, who will take the salute when the marchers arrive in Trinity Square Gardens.

A multi-faith commemorative service and wreath-laying will be held at the Merchant Navy Memorial.

After the service, a ‘sea of Red Ensigns’ will be placed in the lawn at the Sunken Garden, in memory of lost merchantmen.

Further into the future, plans are well under way to honour the Royal and Merchant Navies in WW2 with 70th anniversary commemorations of victory in the Battle of the Atlantic.

Liverpool – home in the war to Western Approaches from where the struggle against the U-boat was directed – will be the focal point of events over the weekend of May 24-27 2013, including a service of thanksgiving.

USA: Transport Dock Arlington Returns Form Sea Trials

3 Septembre 2012

The amphibious transport dock Arlington (LPD 24), the eighth built at Huntington Ingalls Industries , recently returned from successful builder’s sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico. Dock trials started last week, and the ship left HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division on Aug. 21 for three days of at-sea testing.

“Our shipbuilding team worked diligently to get this ship ready for sea,” said Doug Lounsberry, Ingalls’ vice president and program manager, LPD 17 Program. “The LPD team will continue to work just as hard getting Arlington ready for her acceptance trial in October. LPD 24 proved her seaworthiness with strong performance in several different tests, including the ship’s propulsion, steering, navigation, communications and weapons. The folks on board did an outstanding job in operating this entire sea trial. I applaud each and every one of them.”

As with every ship built at Ingalls, a test and trials team thoroughly tested LPD 24′s major operational systems. More than 200 test events took place during the sea trials, including anchor handling, flight operations, ballasting and de-ballasting the well deck, and compartment air balancing.

“The logistics it takes to conduct that many test events in a three-day period requires excellent planning by the test and trials team,” said Richard Schenk, Ingalls’ vice president of test and trials. “The team and the ship performed well. While there is still much work to do in preparation for U.S. Navy acceptance trials, I’m confident the LPD 24 HII/Navy team will have the ship ready. It is incumbent upon us to ensure the safety of every sailor and Marine who will operate this amphibious ship. We do not take that responsibility lightly, and these sea trials prove it.”

The ship will now prepare for acceptance sea trials to demonstrate the same tests and operational success to the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). The ship is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy this year.

The 11 ships of the LPD 17 class are a key element of the Navy’s ability to project power ashore. Collectively, they functionally replace more than 41 ships (the LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113 and LST 1179 classes of amphibious ships), providing the Navy and Marine Corps with modern, sea-based platforms that are networked, survivable and built to operate with 21st century platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey.

Ingalls has delivered six ships in the class and has five more in various stages of construction, including LPD 24. The LPD 17-class ships are 684 feet long and 105 feet wide and displace approximately 25,000 tons. Their principal mission is to deploy the combat and support elements of Marine Expeditionary Units and Brigades. The ships can carry up to 800 troops and have the capability of transporting and debarking air cushion (LCAC) or conventional landing crafts, augmented by helicopters or vertical take-off and landing aircraft such as the MV-22. The ships will support amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions through the first half of the 21st century.

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, HII has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. Employing nearly 38,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, its primary business divisions are Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding.

 

Published From OverBlog

3 Septembre 2012

The sixth and final Type 45 destroyer built by BAE Systems, has set sail from the company’s Scotstoun shipyard to embark on her first stage of sea trials off the west coast of Scotland.

DUNCAN, the sixth and final Type 45 destroyer built by BAE Systems, has today set sail from the company’s Scotstoun shipyard to embark on her first stage of sea trials off the west coast of Scotland.

During three weeks at sea, DUNCAN will undertake an extensive programme of trials that will include testing of her power and propulsion systems, auxiliary and domestic services.

Paul Rafferty, Type 45 Programme Director at BAE Systems, said: “This is the sixth Type 45 destroyer to embark on sea trials, but there will be no complacency in the rigour with which we will put her through her paces and prove her outstanding capabilities. Every stage in the delivery of the Type 45 destroyers brings an enormous amount of pride to those who have worked on the programme and there’s a special significance attached now that all six ships have sailed the seas.”

DUNCAN’s Commander Phil Game Royal Navy, said: “Putting to sea for the first time is a significant milestone in the early life of the ship and a tribute to the teamwork between BAE Systems, MOD and my Royal Navy personnel to get to this point“.

DUNCAN is on track to be handed over to the UK Royal Navy in the first half of next year. This follows the handover of DEFENDER, which was accepted off contract in a ceremony at Portsmouth Naval Base in July. DUNCAN, named after Admiral Lord Viscount Adam Duncan who commanded the Royal Navy to victory over the Dutch Fleet in the Battle of Camperdown in 1797, is affiliated with his home town of Dundee as well as Belfast.

Once handed over, DUNCAN will be based in Portsmouth where BAE Systems will continue to provide ship support alongside the MOD, Royal Navy and industry partners in the Type 45 Class Output Management Team (COM), which works as a single team to sustain the high level of availability required throughout the life of the Type 45 ships. The Type 45 COM currently provides support to all six ships in class, including the four commissioned vessels, HMS DARING, HMS DAUNTLESS, HMS DIAMOND and HMS DRAGON.

The Type 45s will provide the backbone of the UK’s naval air defences for the next 30 years and beyond. The destroyers are capable of carrying out a wide range of operations, including anti-piracy and anti-smuggling activities, disaster relief work and surveillance operations as well as high intensity war fighting.

Each destroyer will be able to engage a large number of targets simultaneously, and defend aircraft carriers or groups of ships, such as an amphibious landing force, against the strongest future threats from the air. The vessels will contribute a specialist air warfare capability to worldwide maritime and joint operations.

During three weeks at sea, DUNCAN will undertake an extensive programme of trials that will include testing of her power and propulsion systems, auxiliary and domestic services.

Paul Rafferty, Type 45 Programme Director at BAE Systems, said: “This is the sixth Type 45 destroyer to embark on sea trials, but there will be no complacency in the rigour with which we will put her through her paces and prove her outstanding capabilities. Every stage in the delivery of the Type 45 destroyers brings an enormous amount of pride to those who have worked on the programme and there’s a special significance attached now that all six ships have sailed the seas.”

DUNCAN is on track to be handed over to the UK Royal Navy in the first half of next year. This follows the handover of DEFENDER, which was accepted off contract in a ceremony at Portsmouth Naval Base in July. DUNCAN, named after Admiral Lord Viscount Adam Duncan who commanded the Royal Navy to victory over the Dutch Fleet in the Battle of Camperdown in 1797, is affiliated with his home town of Dundee as well as Belfast.

Once handed over, DUNCAN will be based in Portsmouth where BAE Systems will continue to provide ship support alongside the MOD, Royal Navy and industry partners in the Type 45 Class Output Management Team (COM), which works as a single team to sustain the high level of availability required throughout the life of the Type 45 ships. The Type 45 COM currently provides support to all six ships in class, including the four commissioned vessels, HMS DARING, HMS DAUNTLESS, HMS DIAMOND and HMS DRAGON.

 

Published From OverBlog

3 Septembre 2012

Skipper of USS Porter Removed from Job After Collision

Posted on Sep 3rd, 2012 with tags after, americas, Collision, Job, News by topic, Porter, Removed, Skiper, USS.

The skipper of the USS Porter has been removed from command after his ship collided with an oil tanker just outside the strategic Strait of Hormuz.

The commander of Naval Surface Force Atlantic relieved Cmdr. Martin Arriola of command on Thursday.

The collision earlier this month left a breach about 10 feet by 10 feet in the starboard side of the USS Porter, a Norfolk-based guided-missile destroyer. No one was injured on either vessel.

The Navy says Rear Adm. Dave Thomas reassigned Arriola to the staff of Naval Surface Force Atlantic because of a loss of confidence in Arriola’s ability to command.

Porter’s new commanding officer is Cmdr. Dave Richardson, the former executive officer of USS McFaul.

The USS Porter is undergoing repair in the United Arab Emirates.

 

 

 

Big Day For Veterans Of Malaya Conflict

3 Septembre 2012

Big day for veterans of Malaya conflict

IAN ALLEN

Last updated 16:00 03/09/2012

0

Share

0

A group of Marlborough war veterans are heading to Wellington later this month for a "long overdue" commemoration of New Zealand's contribution in the Malayan Emergency.

About 14 former army, navy and airforce servicemen from here will take part in the first New Zealand Malayan Veterans' Day Memorial Commemorations on September 16.

A service will be held at the National War Memorial in Wellington before the veterans parade past a reviewing officer within Parliament grounds and take their salute.

The Governor General, members of Parliament, members of the Diplomatic Corps, New Zealand Defence Force and Royal New Zealand Returned Services Association representatives will attend the one-off event.

The Malayan Emergency (1948-1960) came after an attempt by the Malayan Communist Party to overthrow the British colonial administration of Malaya.

The Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation (1963-1966) followed the Malayan Emergency and arose from tensions between Indonesia and the new British-backed Federation of Malaysia which was conceived in the aftermath of the Emergency.

Fifteen New Zealand servicemen lost their lives in Malaya during the Emergency - three as a result of enemy action.

Marlborough man Peter Callahan served in Malaysia for six months in 1959 for the New Zealand army.

Fighting in the Malayan jungle caused all sorts of trouble for Mr Callahan and his comrades.

He recalled one soldier being dragged out of his bed by a tiger. A blast of machine gun fire made the large cat release its grip on the man, who required 57 stitches.

"The problem was he was the only one that knew morse code so had to signal for his own chopper," he said.

Cigarettes and salt were used to remove leeches, Mr Callahan said.

Barry Rolton was part of the Royal New Zealand Navy during the last two years of the Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation.

The navy was on search and destroy missions along the border with Borneo looking for enemy ships, Mr Rolton said.

He remembers long, sleepless nights in hot warships with no air conditioning.

The Malayan Veterans' Day Memorial Commemorations on September 16 would provide personal recognition for those who served there, Mr Rolton said.

"It's long overdue considering the fact we won," he said. "It will be a special moment."

USS Vicksburg (CG 69) Departed Bahrain Aug. 24 Following A Regularly-Scheduled Port Visit.

3 Septembre 2012

Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) departed Bahrain Aug. 24 following a regularly-scheduled port visit.

The visit helped to continue U.S. 5th Fleet effort building global maritime partnerships with Middle Eastern nations and improving maritime safety and security in the region.

“It was good to have some much needed (rest and relaxation) after a lengthy underway,” said Lt. Robert E. Danielson, operations officer aboard Vicksburg. “The long underway was strenuous, but we are here to (complete) a mission and that always comes first.”

Though Sailors still had to stand duty and perform regular maintenance while the ship was in port, they were also able to take advantage of the facilities at Naval Support Activity, Bahrain.

“There were a lot of uniform items I needed, so it was good to be close to a Navy Exchange again,” said Operations Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Priestly J. Birks.

In addition to having access to the base, Sailors were able to take part in Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours such as go-cart racing, a beach barbeque at the Al Bander Resort, a fishing trip, a trip to the Lost Paradise Water Park and a trip to the Bahrain Dolphin Resort, complete with a chance to swim with dolphins.

Apart from the MWR-sponsored tours, there were many other activities to choose from, including sampling the wide variety of cuisine available in Bahrain.

“I spent most of my time using the internet and enjoying the local food,” said Birks. “Overall, it was nice to be back on land.”

Others used the port visit as an opportunity to display their athletic abilities.

Sailors from Vicksburg’s Deck department defeated a group of Vicksburg officers, including the ship’s commanding officer, in a basketball game 45-35.

“The officers played very well,” said Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class (SW) Jeremy Anthony who played on the Deck department team. “We had a lot of fun. The commanding officer played well, the executive officer played well, but in the end, nobody beats Deck.”

This was Vicksburg’s second visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain this deployment.

Vicksburg is on her final deployment, and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

To be informed of the latest articles, subscribe:

Comment on this post

best rated mattress 01/26/2016 08:38

Hi I found your site by mistake when i was searching yahoo for this acne issue, I must say your site is really helpful I also love the design, its amazing!. I don’t have the time at the moment to fully read your site but I have bookmarked it and also add your RSS feeds. I will be back in a day or two. thanks for a great site.

sea fight astuces 12/07/2015 08:54

his is my first time i visit here. I found so many entertaining stuff in your blog, especially its discussion. From the tons of comments on your articles, I guess I am not the only one having all the leisure here! Keep up the excellent work.

mattresses on sale 09/11/2015 14:22

Hi I found your site by mistake when i was searching yahoo for this acne issue, I must say your site is really helpful I also love the design, its amazing!. I don’t have the time at the moment to fully read your site but I have bookmarked it and also add your RSS feeds. I will be back in a day or two. thanks for a great site.